I don’t believe that there are any countries in the world where women are completely equal to men, says Gail Sheehy.

“Women are underrepresented in all areas of society, especially in professions and in the arts, where men dominate,” she tells me.

The fact is that women make up less than 10 per cent of parliamentarians in the UK, according to the Office for National Statistics, which means that women hold only 16 per cent or just over 2,500 seats in the House of Commons. “

Women are less likely than men to seek out leadership roles, especially at the workplace.”

The fact is that women make up less than 10 per cent of parliamentarians in the UK, according to the Office for National Statistics, which means that women hold only 16 per cent or just over 2,500 seats in the House of Commons.

This statistic, Sheey says, is not just a result of men’s political dominance but is also an indicator of the lack of diversity in our politics.

As a result, women have historically been more likely to be the targets of abuse, Sheepy says.

She says that although there is a significant drop in the number of women in senior positions, the real number of female MPs in Westminster remains around 30.

Women have also long been less likely, Sheeey says to have worked in the same occupations as their male counterparts.

In recent years, this gap has widened to around 30 per cent, and even within the professions women still remain less likely.

I don’t think that there is any country in the universe where women can be completely equal.

According to the Women’s Equality Party, a women’s group, just under 60 per cent are employed in the most lucrative industries in Britain.

But Sheeys believes that the gap is much greater.

The government has acknowledged that women’s representation in the workplace is underrepresented, Sheezy says – but it is still far too low.

There are still far fewer female MPs than men in senior roles in government, and a study of parliamentary attendance by The Economist has found that the proportion of women at meetings has been increasing over the past 20 years.

At a time when women are under-represented in public life, this is unacceptable, Sheeesy says.

“”I think that the political system is not treating women fairly, so it is only right that we do everything we can to address the gender gap,” she says.

In the meantime, women’s voices are being heard at a national level.

A recent petition calling for the government to take action on gender inequality in the Parliament has been signed by more than 6,000 people.

On its website, the Women in Parliament campaign also argues that the public service is “not just a job for men and boys but for women too”, and calls for a “more equal, inclusive and representative” workplace.

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